Coonamessett Farm

The Babydoll Southdown Sheep at Coonamessett Farm
HOME
VISITING THE FARM
OUR LOCATION
FARMER RON'S NEWSLETTERS
FARM ACTIVITIES
Meet the Author at the Farm Family Dinner!
JAMAICAN BUFFET AND GRILL
FRIDAY NIGHT FARM FAMILY BUFFET
OUR FARM CAFE
CONE-E-MESSETT ICE CREAM STAND
WHATS READY FOR HARVESTING?
COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE (CSA)
MEMBERSHIPS FOR 2014
WEDDINGS, RECEPTIONS AND OTHER SPECIAL EVENTS
COONAMESSETT FARM GIFT CARDS
SAVE THE SILO!
GENERAL STORE
FARM INTERNSHIPS
EDUCATIONAL AND SCHOOL TOURS
LITTLE SPROUTS CHILDREN'S GARDENING PROGRAM
CHILDREN'S PARTIES
4-H AT THE FARM
Map of the Farm
Our Animals
OUR WIND TURBINE AND NEW SOLAR PANELS
PARTNER RESTAURANTS
Shellfish Aquaculture Division
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT DIVISION

Babydoll Southdown Facts

History

Originating on the South Down hills of Sussex County England, the Southdown is the oldest of the Down breeds. These small sheep were extremely hardy and produced good flavored meat. In 1780 John Ellman, realized the potential of these animals and set out to standardize the Southdown breed. By 1803, The Southdown reached America but could not compete with the bigger animals and were crossbred to produce the large leggy Southdown of today.

The last remaining flocks of this original style Southdown sheep were found, in 1990 after a five year search. A registry separate from the modern Southdown Registry was necessary to preserve the unique conformation and size of the miniature Baby Doll Southdown. Three hundred fifty of these sheep were located and accepted into the Foundation Registry. The sheep that were registered were located in small flocks that had been kept pure by dedicated, experienced breeders.

Description

Adult Baby Dolls are 24 inches or less at the shoulder without wool; however many are in the 18 to 22 inch range. White is the predominant color, but there are a few blacks.

The little Southdowns have qualities that endear them to all who see them. They are gentle and quiet sheep. Having been bred for so many years to be tolerant of small areas, they do not require a large pasture. They have strong flocking instincts and do not do well as singles ; therefore they are usually sold in pairs. They do well with other non-aggressive livestock and offer diversity to any breeding program.

Neither sex has horns and the rams are not aggressive. They do not wander or bother fences nor do they attempt to jump them.

Ewes are good mothers who often have twins and occasionally triplets. They require protection from predators and adequate shelter in cold weather. They are an ancient breed and are not prone to many of the modern sheep problems and are resistant to foot rot . Baby Dolls are cared for as other sheep - regular worming, foot trimming , yearly shearing and vaccination, covers most of their care and treatment.

Their wool is short stapled and fine. It grades at about 55-60, and spinners enjoy working with the wool. Fleece test at 19- 20 microns, which puts it in the class of cashmere. It has more barbs per inch than any other wool types and makes it ideal to blend with either angora rabbit or angora goat for spinning.

 

 

The Babydoll Southdown Sheep of Coonamessett Farm

DAISY, a black female born 5/05/02. 

COCO PUFF, a black female and Daisy’s daughter, born 6/13/05. 

MAISY, a black female and Coco's daughter was born 4/30/07. 
 
TANK, a light cream colored male born March 27, 2011

Coco and Tank are prowd parents of a new lamb born this spring!


Coco and friends
cocos08lambs1.jpg

Daisy's 08 lamb, Peony.

dasies08lamb.jpg

Coco's '07 lambs

daisybabys07.jpg